April 9

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How Long Does a Kitchen Renovation Take?

An average full kitchen renovation will take around 4 weeks to complete. Of course, there are some factors that could extend or shorten your kitchen renovation timeline.

Here’s a rundown of what a 4-week kitchen renovation schedule might look like. For your benefit, I’ve included the most likely things that could prolong your project and some top time-saving tips for each stage. 

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Take note... 

If you’re planning a simple kitchen remodel, you may only need a rip out and dry fit, so your timeline will be shorter than 4 weeks. If you have a bigger project or complex design that requires building work or new flooring, it’s possible your schedule will extend beyond 4 weeks. We can figure out what your timeline will look like in the planning phase. 

Kitchen Renovation Planning & Design 

Before I lay out your kitchen remodel timeline, it’s important to note that before any remodel work can take place, you’ll have to carry out the planning and design phase of your project. 

How long this phase will take can vary, depending on how much help you have, how complex your ideas are and how sure you are about what you want. 

If you feel pretty lost at this stage, I would advise you to contact us. We can help you sort through all the ideas and come up with the perfect plan and design for your new kitchen. 

Now, let’s get to work!

kitchen renovation 4 week timeline

Week One

Rip Out - 1 day

Before any real kitchen remodeling work can start, the old kitchen needs to be ripped out. Whatever you don’t intend to keep for your new kitchen should be ripped out. Old appliances, units, tiles, flooring etc. 

Plumbing 1st Fix - 1 day

Your plumber will come in to lay the pipework so that water supply and waste can flow to and from the appliances smoothly. 

Time Saver

Ask your plumber to install isolators on kitchen pipework. This makes the 2nd fix easier. It also makes it quicker to stop any leaks in the future, change your tap and it allows you to control the temperature of your mixer, if you have different pressures between hot and cold water. 

Electrical 1st Fix - 2 days

Once the plumber is finished, your electrician will fit electrical cables into the walls and ceilings. He’ll make sure that all light fixtures, switches and sockets are lined up appropriately. 

If you’re not moving appliances or don’t need full rewiring, then you’ll save some time here. Your electrician will be able to complete the 1st fix in less than a day. 

Time Saver 

  • Ask your electrician to double-check all socket and light placements. They’re hard to move once plastering is done. If you have an upstand, then you’ll need to have sockets positioned high enough to ensure clearance for the plugs.
  • Have your appliance specifications on hand so your electrician can be sure he’s using the correct cabling. For example, an induction hob draws a lot of power and will need a larger feed than most other appliances. 

2 Most Likely Things to Delay Week One

  1. Tile removal or wallpaper stripping can push your schedules out at this early stage. It’s hard to estimate these until you actually start.
  2. Any remedial repairs or minor construction works needed to get the space ready for a new layout. These jobs might extend past the first week because they need to be done before you start plastering.

Week Two

Plastering - 2 days

Once your plumber and electrician have finished fitting all necessary pipes and cables, your walls and ceiling are ready for new plastering. 

While a plastering job will give your kitchen remodel the best possible finish, it’s possible you don’t need it. Cutting this job out may save you a couple of days. 

Dry Day - 2 days

Give your new plaster job at least 2 days to fully dry out. If you move on too quickly and it’s not fully dry, your paint job won't adhere correctly to the wall. 

Delivery & Paint - 1 day

Paint Mist Coat

Once dry, your walls and ceilings are ready for a mist coat. A mist coat is a mixture of paint and water, which will soak into the dry new plaster better than a regular coat of paint. 

This mist coat will ensure the integrity of the final paint job, meaning it’ll last longer and give you a better finish. 

Time Saver

If you have the time, go for a second coat of regular paint after your mist coat, but not a third. The paint job might be damaged during appliance or worktop installation and will most likely need touch-ups. 

Kitchen Delivery 

While your kitchen fitting won’t happen until next week, schedule your kitchen delivery for the end of this second week. This way, your new cabinets and appliances will be ready to go right when your kitchen fitter arrives on Monday so he can get straight to fitting. 

Time Saver

If you have limited space on-site, it may make sense to get flat packed units as they take up less storage space before assembly. 

2 Most Likely Things to Delay Week Two

  1. Some walls will require additional time to dry. This is often because the plaster needs to be thicker due to the uneven surface they are applied to.
  2. Delivery delays are a major cause of schedule setbacks. Check the lead time and ensure that it’s booked way in advance.

Week Three

Dry Fit - 5 days

With your kitchen already delivered, your kitchen fitter can get to work fitting cabinets and countertops, sinks and installing your new appliances. 

Time Saver

When comparing kitchens, the pre-assembled kitchen will be quicker to install. You could save on fitting costs and time.  

Templating - 1 day

Templating only applies for certain types of worktops. When you’re dealing with very expensive countertop materials like granite or quartz, templating by an expert is necessary to make sure your measurements are perfect. Normal laminate worktops don’t need templating and can be installed by your kitchen fitter. 

2 Most Likely Things to Delay Week Three

  1. Kitchens arrive unassembled or flat packed. Build this into your time frame in advance. Draws and larder units take a disproportionate amount of time to assemble. 
  2. The fitter damaging something on assembly. It's worth getting an experienced fitter to minimise this risk. 

Week Four

Paint - 4 days

The final paint job should involve one or two coats, depending on how many were applied before kitchen installation. This phase can take some time, especially if you have intricate woodwork that needs preparation before paint.

Worktop Install - 1 day

If you can, schedule a break in the middle of your paint phase for worktop install. The installation is likely to cause some scuffs and minor damage to the walls, so having your painter finish the job after the install will ensure a clean finish. 

Plumbing 2nd Fix - 1 day

With your worktop put in and your second coat of paint under way, you can have your plumber come in to connect the sink and appliances. He should test everything to make sure it’s in working order and check for any leaks. 

Time Saver

Before you schedule your plumber to come in during your final paint phase, check with both tradesmen to make sure they’re okay with this arrangement. They should be able to work around each other no problem, but communication is key so they know what to expect and can plan accordingly. 

Electrical 2nd Fix - 1 day

Once your plumber is finished, your electrician is good to carry out his 2nd fix the next day. They will connect all the light fixtures and install outlet faceplates, making sure to test everything before they leave. Your electrician should come in after painting is done to avoid any paint mess on newly fitted sockets. 

Time Saver

If your plumber finishes his 2nd fix quickly, and your painter is done, you can schedule your electrician to come in later that same day. 

Snags - 1 day

Once all the work is completed, any small issues like defects or minor damages (aka snags) can be taken care of. These are usually cosmetic flaws, like a scratch or a small crack, or bits that may have been missed, like a screw missing or cover not fitted. These issues shouldn't take long to fix. 

2 Most Likely Things to Delay Week Four

  1. The painter makes a mess on the new kitchen parts. Ensure your painter takes the appropriate measures to fully protect the new kitchen before painting begins. This is why we suggest mist coating before installing the kitchen remodel parts.
  2. Worktop installation can sometimes cause damage to the walls which will require repair. 

Week Five?

Snags

If all goes according to plan, these should have been taken care of in week 4. However, if your snagging list is long, and your minor snags don’t look so minor, you won’t be able to finish on time. 

Why might your snags be bigger problems? 

Could be cheap materials or equipment, but it’s usually poor workmanship.  

The best way to avoid having to extend your renovation into week 5 is to make sure you...

  • Hire the right tradesmen and stay on top of them.
  • Order good quality appliances and materials from reputable sellers.

Full kitchen renovation in 4 weeks… is this really possible? 

Yes. 

Of course, when remodeling a kitchen there are a lot of things that could go wrong and extend your project time frame. A complex design may take a long time to finish or require more trades. Planning your own kitchen remodel can be like walking through a minefield of possible delays.

But a kitchen renovation doesn’t have to drag on and on. It doesn’t have to be filled with roadblocks and schedule conflicts. 

It can actually be… smooth. It helps to have a project manager who knows who to hire, when to schedule each trade and how to swiftly deal with unforeseen challenges along the way. 

Send us a quick message and we can help you carry out your full kitchen renovation, sticking to the schedule without compromising on quality or finish. 

If you found this post useful, don't forget to share...

A full kitchen renovation in just 4 weeks? Yes. Your remodel doesn't have to drag on and on. It can actually be... smooth. Find out how to keep your project on our 4 week timeline. 

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kitchen, trades


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